Help reduce the stigma about mental health

Help reduce the stigma about mental health

Help reduce the stigma about mental health

We need to think more broadly about health. The World Health Organization defines health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.

According to the 2017 Community Health Status Survey, 1 in 5 adults in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky said that a doctor or health care provider told them they had depression—and that’s just one of many mental health conditions.

To truly move forward in this area, we need to address stigma. If people feel ashamed, they’re less likely to seek the care they need. Some strategies from the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI):

  • Get educated. Mental health conditions are not the result of personal weakness, lack of character or poor upbringing.
  • See the person, not the condition. Get to know people and treat them with kindness and empathy.
  • Take action. Help ensure that policies and systems allow people who need treatment to access the care they need.

Visit NAMI’s website at www.nami.org/Find-Support and www.nami.org/stigmafree to learn more.

Dr. O’dell Moreno Owens is the president and chief executive officer of Interact for Health and InterAct for Change. Dr. Owens is a reproductive endocrinologist. He earned an MD, an OB/GYN residency and a master’s of public health degree from Yale University School of Medicine. He also obtained a fellowship in reproductive endocrinology at Harvard Medical School. In recent years, Dr. Owens has served as the Hamilton County Coroner, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College President, and Interim Health Commissioner and Medical Director of the Cincinnati Health Department.

Health Watch

Greater Cincinnati Health Watch is a free biweekly e-mail newsletter published by Interact for Health.

Sign Up Now

Prescription Drop Box Map

Happening Now

  • Chronic medical conditions prevalent among Greater Cincinnati children

    Asthma, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and anxiety are the most commonly diagnosed chronic conditions among children in the Greater Cincinnati region, according to data collected through the 2017 Child Well-Being Survey.

    Learn More

  • Most Ohio adults think state should adopt health education standards

    The Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP) is conducted every year to learn more about the health opinions, behaviors and status of adults in Ohio. In 2017, OHIP asked Ohio adults about state health education standards.

    Learn More

  • Health and healthy behaviors among youth in our region.

    The 2017 Child Well-Being Survey (CWBS) asked parents and guardians of youth in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky to describe the overall health of their child. CWBS also asked about specific health behaviors such as physical activity and sleep patterns.

    Learn More

  • Results show shift in perception from substance abuse being seen as moral failure to a chronic illness.

    The Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found that 7 in 10 Kentucky adults believe that addiction is a disease (70%). Attitudes towards addiction as a disease were the same both among respondents who have a family member or friend who has experienced problems with substance abuse, and among those who did not indicate such firsthand experience with addiction.

    Learn More

  • Kentucky adults continue to cite heroin use as causing problems for friends, family

    The most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) and Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP) has found that more than 2 in 10 Ohio adults (23%) report knowing someone who has trouble as a result of using heroin, while just under 2 in 10 Kentucky adults (16%) report knowing someone affected by heroin use.

    Learn More