Health Status Survey: white Appalachians more likely have high blood pressure, cholesterol; more likely to be obese than white non-Appalachians

The Greater Cincinnati Community Health Status Survey’s (GCCHSS) analysis of health data from the white Appalachian population found that white Appalachian adults were more likely to report chronic cardiovascular conditions like high blood pressure and high cholesterol than white non-Appalachians, and were more likely to be obese. They were also less likely to meet recommendations for physical activity. They were similar to white non-Appalachians in reporting they went without a needed doctor’s care because the household needed the money to pay for food, clothing our housing. The
percentages for both groups more than doubled between 2005 and 2010.

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