Publications

Publications

The publications listed below, produced by Interact for Health (formerly known as The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati), are available in PDF by clicking on the appropriate title (requires Acrobat Reader).

 

Topics

 

Access to Care
Capacity Building
Children's Health
Criminal Justice
Evaluation
General Health
Health Resource
Mental Health
Overviews and Survey Results
Substance Use Disorders

 

Access to Care

 

  • Kentuckians' Experiences with Having a Medical Home (July 2010): This was one issue covered in the 2009 Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP). According to the Poll, 82% of Kentuckians have a medical home. Read the data release here.

 

 

 

  • Physicians and Charity Care in Greater Cincinnati (November 2008): This is a summary on the Greater Cincinnati Physician Study that assessed the current level of uncompensated care provided by physicians in the Greater Cincinnati region. Read the summary here.

 

 

 

  • Health Links: Your Guide to Health Care Resources in Greater Cincinnati (May 2008): People need a regular source of medical and dental care to stay healthy. If you don't have a regular source of care, this guide can help you find this care and learn about the region's healthcare system.

 

 

 

 

  • Physician Recruitment and Retention in Greater Cincinnati (March 2008): This study discusses if the Greater Cincinnati region has enough physicians and specialists to provide care for the people who live here. Working with the Doctors' Foundation, the Health Foundation commissioned this paper to learn more about physician recruitment and retention in Greater Cincinnati. Read the study here.

 

 

  • Exploring Primary Care Services and Resources in Greater Cincinnati: A Chart Book of the Issues (January 2006): This chart book presents data about where primary care services and resources are located in the 20-county region, focusing on community health centers and preventable hospital use. Read the chart book here.

 

 

 

  • Exploring Primary Care Services and Resources in Greater Cincinnati: An Overview of the Issues (July 2006): This companion to the chart book provides an overview of primary care services and resources, focusing on community health centers and preventable hospital use. Read the overview here.

 

 

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Capacity Building

 

  • Getting In Print: An informal study of how newspapers cover health-related foundations and the impact on media strategies (July 2007): This report aims to provide some perspective and ideas for health foundations and nonprofits that may be useful in discussing media and communications strategies. The first section summarizes the makeup and findings of the study. The second section includes a summary and conclusions from each of the six print media markets that were chosen for the study. Read the report here.

 

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Children's Health

 

  • School-based health centers in Greater Cincinnati: Improving student health to promote community well-being (March 2013, updated 2014) Recognizing the fundamental connection between student health, academic achievement and stable communities, The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati has spearheaded a public-private initiative to improve access to care for area students by funding school-based health centers. Today some 25,000 students in the Greater Cincinnati region have access to 26 school-based health centers, and the number continues to grow. This report looks at the school-based health center model, how the Health Foundation brought together a coalition to improve healthcare access for students in Cincinnati Public Schools and how students are benefitting from the health centers. To read the report, click here.

 

  • Evaluation of Healthcare Costs and Utilization among Medicaid Recipients in Schools with School-Based Health Centers Final Report (August 2005): This study was designed to measure the cost effectiveness of these school-based health centers (SBHCs). This study focused on four SBHCs in three urban and one rural Ohio school districts in Greater Cincinnati. Two Ohio schools without SBHCs, one urban and one rural, served as comparison schools. The study period for this report covered five-and-a-half years, from September 1997 to February 2003 (5.5 calendar years). This study looked at the 5,506 students who were enrolled in the six schools and in the Ohio Medicaid program. Read the study here.

 

  • Evaluation of Health Outcomes of Students Using School-Based Health Centers Public Survey Report (August 2005): This survey consisted of all students enrolled at eight selected public schools with SBHCs, their parents, and school staff. Read the survey here.

 

 

 

  • A Prescription for Success (August 2005): This report summarizes two studies on school-based health centers and their effect on student health status, use of healthcare services and attendance, and costs to the system. Read the report here.

 

 

 

  • A Prescription for Success Executive Summary (August 2005): This summary presents the high-level findings of two studies on school-based health centers and their affect on student health status, use of healthcare services and attendance, and costs to the system. Read the summary here.

 

 

  • The Need for Behavioral Health Services for School-Age Children: A Survey of Students in Southwestern Ohio (June 2003): The Butler County Mental Health Board, the Clermont County Mental Health and Recovery Board, and Mental Health and Recovery Services of Warren & Clinton Counties collectively decided to do a broad needs assessments of the students in their counties to determine the extent and depths of students' needs. Read the assessment here.

 

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Criminal Justice

 

  • Substance Use Disorder and Severe Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice System Initiative: Between 1999 and 2008, the Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati awarded $12 million in 99 grants to improve the health of people with mental illnesses and substance use disorders in the criminal justice system. Vast majorities of the grant projects reported positive client outcomes, including improved mental health, reduced substance use and reduced recidivism. The report was written by the Urban Institute, an organization in Washington, D.C., that conducts nonpartisan economic and social policy research. Read the full report here.

  • Spanning Systems: Lessons Learned from the Substance Use Disorder and Severe Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice System Initiative (Nov. 2012): This report summarizes an analysis of the Foundation's Substance Use Disorder and Severe Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice Initiative by the Urban Institute, an organization in Washington, D.C., that conducts nonpartisan economic and social policy research. Among the lessons learned: planning is critical, collaboration is key, and data collection is difficult but important to ensure the success and sustainability of projects. Read the report here.

 

  • Interim Grantmaking Report - Substance Use Disorders and Severe Mental Illnesses in the Criminal Justice System (March 2009): This interim report presents an overview of the initiative and what the Health Foundation has learned so far about funding grants that address substance use disorders and severe mental illnesses in the criminal justice system. It combines the results of a feasibility study we conducted in 2007 with grant results and thoughts from our Senior Program Officers. We have also included quotes from our grantees in the margins of this report to give their perspective. Read the report here.

 

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Evaluation

 

  • Where We Are Now: Results from the 2010 Grantee Perception Survey (November 2011) - We asked the Center for Effective Philanthropy (CEP) to survey our grantees about how we work with them. CEP compiled our grantees' feedback and compared our ratings with other funders and with our 2003 results. The resulting report tells us where we're strong, where we're improving and where we have room to grow. To read the report, click here.

 

 

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General Health

 

  • Physician Recruitment and Retention in Greater Cincinnati (March 2008): This study discusses if the Greater Cincinnati region has enough physicians and specialists to provide care for the people who live here. Working with the Doctors' Foundation, the Health Foundation commissioned this paper to learn more about physician recruitment and retention in Greater Cincinnati. Read the study here.

 

 

  • 2005 Greater Cincinnati Hispanic/Latino Health Survey: This report presents the results of a survey of Hispanic/Latino adults in Greater Cincinnati, conducted in Fall 2005. Topics include access to care, acculturation, cigarette and alcohol use, health insurance coverage, health status, mental health, and prenatal care and birth outcomes, as well as a demographic overview of respondents.

 

 

 

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Health Resource

 

  • Health Links: Your Guide to Health Care Resources in Greater Cincinnati (May 2008): People need a regular source of medical and dental care to stay healthy. If you don't have a regular source of care, this guide can help you find this care and learn about the region's healthcare system.

 

 

 

 

  • Physician Recruitment and Retention in Greater Cincinnati (March 2008): This study discusses if the Greater Cincinnati region has enough physicians and specialists to provide care for the people who live here. Working with the Doctors' Foundation, the Health Foundation commissioned this paper to learn more about physician recruitment and retention in Greater Cincinnati. Read the study here.

 

 

  • Catalyst for Change: Stories of Change and Transformation (October 2003): This report shares success stories from The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati's first five years of work with its community partners. Read the report here.

 

 

 

 

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Mental Health

 

  • Spanning Systems: Lessons Learned from the Substance Use Disorder and Severe Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice System Initiative (Nov. 2012): This report summarizes an analysis of the Foundation's Substance Use Disorder and Severe Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice Initiative by the Urban Institute, an organization in Washington, D.C., that conducts nonpartisan economic and social policy research. Among the lessons learned: planning is critical, collaboration is key, and data collection is difficult but important to ensure the success and sustainability of projects. Read the report here.

 

  • Social Enterprise: What We've Learned (June 2012): This publication examines what worked and what didn’t work during the Health Foundation’s initiative to fund social enterprises. Read the report here.

 

 

 

 

  • What Ohioans Think about Integrating Mental and Physical Health Care (August 2010): To find out what Ohioans think about having mental and physical health services in the same location ��??? whether that is physical health care in a mental health setting, or vice versa ��??? the 2010 Ohio Health Issues Poll asked Ohioans what they think about the integration of mental and physical health care. Read the data release here.

 

 

 

  • Voices of FACT: How Forensic Assertive Community Treatment Changes Lives (May 2009): The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati has funded 10 ACT teams in our region, four of which are FACT teams. This is a study of the results of these 10 ACT teams. The Health Foundation heard from consumers, staff and community stakeholders that FACT has changed their lives and their communities. Read the report here.

 

 

 

  • Interim Grantmaking Report - Substance Use Disorders and Severe Mental Illnesses in the Criminal Justice System (March 2009): This interim report presents an overview of the initiative and what the Health Foundation has learned so far about funding grants that address substance use disorders and severe mental illnesses in the criminal justice system. It combines the results of a feasibility study we conducted in 2007 with grant results and thoughts from our Senior Program Officers. We have also included quotes from our grantees in the margins of this report to give their perspective. Read the report here.

 

 

  • Reclaiming 25 Years of Life Integrating Physical and Mental Health Care to Reduce Health Disparities for People with Severe Mental Illnesses (October 2008): Part of our series "Location, Location, Location: Providing Physical Health Care in Other Settings to Increase Access," this white paper presents an overview of the health disparities of people with severe mental illnesses, some of the factors that contribute to these disparities, and two strategies that can be used to address these disparities. Read the paper here.

 

 

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Overviews and Survey Results

 

  • 2012 Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP):  Since 2005, the Ohio Health Issues Poll has provided health status and brief socioeconomic profiles of the state combined with public opinion on health-related topics. The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati has combined state-level public opinion polls with health assessment surveys to create a powerful tool for health policy development. OHIP is conducted by the Institute for Policy Research at the University of Cincinnati as part of the Ohio Poll. Topics vary by year. In the 2012 poll, we asked questions about the healthcare reform law, access to mental health services, insurance, poverty and health, going into debt to pay for healthcare, fracking, and usual sources of care and wait times. Briefs about these topics, and briefs from previous years, can be found here.

 

  • Substance Use in Southeast Indiana: In June 2012 the Assistance for Substance Abuse Prevention (ASAP) Center and the Institute for Policy Research at the University of Cincinnati released data about smoking, excessive alcohol use and the misuse of prescription drugs in Dearborn, Franklin, Ohio, Ripley and Switzerland counties in Southeast Indiana. Read the report about tobacco and alcohol use here. Read the report about prescription drug misuse and disposal here.

 

 

  • 2011 Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP): Since 2008, the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky and The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati have sponsored the Kentucky Health Issues Poll, a telephone survey to find out what Kentuckians think about various health issues that affect our communities, our state and our nation. Topics vary by year. In the 2011 poll, we asked questions about the state's priorities, health insurance, a statewide smoke-free law, misuse and disposal of prescription pain relievers, the Affordable Care Act, childhood obesity, mental health services, caregiving and firearms. Briefs about these topics can be found here. These findings were also published as reports presenting the views of respondents from the following areas:

 

 

  • 2010 Greater Cincinnati Community Health Status Survey (GCCHSS): This survey gives an in-depth look at the self-reported health status of Greater Cincinnati residents. The results are from interviews with more than 2,000 randomly selected adults residing in a 22-county area, including eight counties in Ohio, nine counties in Kentucky and five counties in Indiana. Topics covered in the 2010 GCCHSS include access to care, insurance coverage, obesity, nutrition and exercise, smoking rates, alcohol use, prescription and over-the-counter drug misuse, and dental and eye health, among others. Briefs and reports from the 2010 survey, which were released between December 2010 and March 2012, can be found here. Briefs and reports from the 2005 survey can be found here.

 

  • 2005 Greater Cincinnati Hispanic/Latino Health Survey: This report presents the results of a survey of Hispanic/Latino adults in Greater Cincinnati, conducted in Fall 2005. Topics include access to care, acculturation, cigarette and alcohol use, health insurance coverage, health status, mental health, and prenatal care and birth outcomes, as well as a demographic overview of respondents.

 

 

 

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Substance Use Disorders

 

  • Spanning Systems: Lessons Learned from the Substance Use Disorder and Severe Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice System Initiative (Nov. 2012): This report summarizes an analysis of the Foundation's Substance Use Disorder and Severe Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice Initiative by the Urban Institute, an organization in Washington, D.C., that conducts nonpartisan economic and social policy research. Among the lessons learned: planning is critical, collaboration is key, and data collection is difficult but important to ensure the success and sustainability of projects. Read the report here.

 

  • Supporting Community-Based Substance Abuse Prevention: Lessons learned from 10 years of the ASAP Center (March 2010): This report starts where the ASAP Center began, with an understanding of substance ASAP: A Support System for Community-Based Prevention, the ASAP Center and The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati abuse prevention, and the community in which we work. Next, it describes what the ASAP Center does to support community-based prevention. Using data from ASAP Center and other community surveys and interviews of staff and community partners, the report outlines the effects the ASAP Center has had on our community. It provides tips and suggestions for people interested in building a prevention-support system. Finally, the report discusses where the ASAP Center will go from here. Read the report here.

 

  • What Ohioans Think About Treatment vs. Prison for People with Substance Use Disorders (August 2009): These findings are from The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati’s Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP), part of the Ohio Poll conducted in 2009 by the Institute for Policy Research at the University of Cincinnati. Read the brief here.

 

 

 

  • Interim Grantmaking Report - Substance Use Disorders and Severe Mental Illnesses in the Criminal Justice System (March 2009): This interim report presents an overview of the initiative and what the Health Foundation has learned so far about funding grants that address substance use disorders and severe mental illnesses in the criminal justice system. It combines the results of a feasibility study we conducted in 2007 with grant results and thoughts from our Senior Program Officers. We have also included quotes from our grantees in the margins of this report to give their perspective. Read the report here.

 

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Health Watch

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Happening Now

  • Chronic medical conditions prevalent among Greater Cincinnati children

    Asthma, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and anxiety are the most commonly diagnosed chronic conditions among children in the Greater Cincinnati region, according to data collected through the 2017 Child Well-Being Survey.

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  • Most Ohio adults think state should adopt health education standards

    The Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP) is conducted every year to learn more about the health opinions, behaviors and status of adults in Ohio. In 2017, OHIP asked Ohio adults about state health education standards.

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  • Health and healthy behaviors among youth in our region.

    The 2017 Child Well-Being Survey (CWBS) asked parents and guardians of youth in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky to describe the overall health of their child. CWBS also asked about specific health behaviors such as physical activity and sleep patterns.

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  • Results show shift in perception from substance abuse being seen as moral failure to a chronic illness.

    The Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found that 7 in 10 Kentucky adults believe that addiction is a disease (70%). Attitudes towards addiction as a disease were the same both among respondents who have a family member or friend who has experienced problems with substance abuse, and among those who did not indicate such firsthand experience with addiction.

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  • Kentucky adults continue to cite heroin use as causing problems for friends, family

    The most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) and Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP) has found that more than 2 in 10 Ohio adults (23%) report knowing someone who has trouble as a result of using heroin, while just under 2 in 10 Kentucky adults (16%) report knowing someone affected by heroin use.

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