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How regional, neighborhood health are perceived in region

Aug 31, 2017

DATA SUMMARYDATA TABLES

Where people live affects their health. Living in a healthy neighborhood has a positive impact on personal and community health. To assess if adults in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky feel our community is a healthy place to live, the 2017 Community Health Status Survey (CHSS) asked two questions about regional and neighborhood health.

3 in 10 adults rate region excellent or very good for health

CHSS asked, “How would you rate the Greater Cincinnati region as a healthy place to live?”

Overall, about 3 in 10 adults (32%) said the region was excellent or very good as a healthy place to live. This is about the same as 2013.

Responses varied by region. Residents of Hamilton County suburbs were most likely to say the region is a healthy place to live. About 4 in 10 adults living there (39%) rated the region excellent or very good. Residents of rural Ohio1 (26%) and rural Kentucky2 (19%) counties were least likely to say the region is a healthy place to live. Responses in most areas remained stable between 2013 and 2017. However, adults in rural Indiana counties3 were more likely to say the region is a healthy place to live in 2017 (27%) than in 2013 (18%).

4 in 10 say their neighborhood is a healthy place to live

CHSS also asked, “How would you rate your neighborhood as a healthy place to live? Would you say excellent, very good, good, fair or poor?” More than 4 in 10 adults in the region (44%) said their own neighborhood was excellent or very good as a healthy place to live. This is less than in 2013 (48%). Similar to 2013, City of Cincinnati residents were the least likely to rate their neighborhood as excellent or very good (23%), while residents of Butler, Clinton and Warren counties were the most likely (54%) to do so.

The percentage of adults who said their neighborhood is excellent or very good as a healthy place to live declined between 2013 and 2017 for Hamilton County suburbs and counties in Kentucky.4 Responses in other areas remained about the same.

Race, income play a role in perception of regional and neighborhood health

African American adults were less likely than White adults to report that the region or their neighborhood is a healthy place to live.

Adults earning 100% or less of the Federal Poverty Guidelines (FPG)5 were less likely than adults earning more than 100% FPG to rate the region or their neighborhood as a healthy place to live.


1 Adams, Brown, Clermont and Highland counties.

2 Bracken, Carroll, Gallatin, Owen and Pendleton counties.

3 Dearborn, Franklin, Ohio, Ripley and Switzerland counties.

4 Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, Owen and Pendleton counties.

5 In 2015, 100% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines was $24,250 for a family of four.

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