News Release Archive

Most Ohio adults have appropriate, usual source of health care, except for uninsured; uninsured, poor have more trouble getting urgent appointment

August 2, 2012

The 2012 OHIP found that 8 in 10 Ohio adults report having a usual source of care – a usual clinic, health center or doctor’s office to go to when they are sick or need medical advice. However, only about half of the uninsured have a usual source of care. More than 9 in 10 Ohio adults reported that they did not have difficulty getting an appointment for routine care or a checkup and nearly 9 in 10 reported that they did not have difficulty getting an appointment when they needed care right away. Uninsured adults reported having trouble getting an urgent appointment with their doctor at more than double the rate of insured Ohio adults. Those under 200 percent of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) reported having trouble getting an urgent care appointment at nearly three times the rate of adults living above 200 percent FPL.

Most Ohioans know little about fracking, split on health concerns

July 30, 2012

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, is a relatively new way to extract natural gas. Supporters of fracking see it as new revenue for the state and a chance to create high-paying jobs. Opponents are concerned about the impact of this type of drilling, including the chemicals used in the process, on the environment and the health of those living near fracking sites. OHIP found that most Ohio adults said they knew a little or nothing at all about fracking. Ohioans familiar with fracking were almost evenly split when asked if they thought fracking poses a threat to the health of the general public.

Most of Ohio adults do not have medical debt; uninsured, poor, African Americans and those in poor health report higher debt

July 26, 2012

The 2012 Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP) found that the majority of Ohio adults (58 percent) do not have any unpaid medical debt. Among people with medical debt, the largest percentage owes less than $2,000 (25 percent). These percentages are similar to 2009 results. Ohio adults were also asked if they had to change their lives significantly in the past 12 months to pay medical bills; more than 1.6 million Ohio adults (19 percent) reported that they had to do so. This is down slightly from 24 percent in 2009.

Number of uninsured remains stable; public insurance increasing; employer coverage declining

July 23, 2012

The Ohio Health Issues Poll found that nearly 2 in 10 Ohio adults ages 18-64 lack health insurance, which is similar to results for the past several years. In Ohio, as in other states, more working-age adults have publicly funded health insurance (e.g, Medicare or Medicaid). OHIP found that currently, 2 in 10 Ohio adults ages 18-64 are covered by a form of public insurance, up from 1 in 10 adults ages 18-64 in 2006. In contrast, the number of Ohio adults with health insurance through their employer or their spouse’s employer has been steadily declining.

4 in 10 Ohio adults report having known someone who shows signs of serious depression

July 9, 2012

Mental health issues, including depression, are a significant public health issue in Ohio. To understand the size of the problem in Ohio and learn if Ohioans know how to find help, the 2012 Ohio Health Issues Poll included questions about access to mental health treatment services. Four in 10 Ohio adults reported that a friend or family member had ever behaved in a way that made them think that person had a serious problem with depression. Of the nearly 7 in 10 who said they knew where to get help for a friend or family member, only about 4 in 10 would suggest contacting a mental health professional. Nearly half would recommend getting in touch with other health care providers, such as a primary care doctor.

Ohioans with higher incomes consistently report better health

July 5, 2012

An important indicator of well-being is adults’ overall self-rated health status. Since the Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP) began in 2005, people with higher incomes have consistently reported better health status, and this was true once again in 2012. Each year since 2005 more than 6 in 10 Ohioans living above 200 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) reported being in “excellent” or “very good” health. This compares with between 2 in 10 and 3 in 10 Ohioans living below 100 percent FPL.

Understanding of health reform law still low

June 26, 2012

Only 4 in 10 Ohio adults report that they have enough information about the new health reform law to understand how the law will affect them personally. This is up slightly from 3 in 10 in March of 2011, however, Ohioans understanding of how the law will affect them personally has been consistently below the nation, where slightly over half say they understand how the law will affect them personally.

More than 8 in 10 Ohioans say health care is a top priority, regardless of court ruling

June 21, 2012

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as the health care reform law, was heard before the U.S. Supreme Court in March 2012, and the Court’s decision on the law’s constitutionality is expected sometime this month. In order to understand how many Ohioans are following the case and how important affordable, quality health care is for Ohio adults, the Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP) included several questions about the health care reform law and the Supreme Court decision. OHIP, conducted annually, identifies what residents think about various health issues that affect communities, the state and the nation. It is funded by The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati. According to OHIP, if the Supreme Court rules that the entire health care law is unconstitutional, a large majority of Ohioans think that providing access to affordable quality health care for all Americans should remain an important priority for the President and Congress.

16,000 Southeast Indiana adults know someone who has had problems as a result of abusing prescription pain relievers

June 13, 2012 

According to a 2012 oversample from the Greater Cincinnati Survey, nearly 1 in 5 (18 percent) Southeast Indiana adults reported that they had friends or family members who had problems as a result of abusing prescription pain relievers. This means an estimated 16,000 Southeast Indiana adults know someone who has abused prescription pain relievers. The ASAP (Assistance for Substance Abuse Prevention) Center sponsored the research.

African American adults are less healthy than other adults in our region

May 22, 2012

The Greater Cincinnati Community Health Status Survey’s (GCCHSS) analysis of health data from an oversample of African Americans found that African American adults are less healthy than other adults in our region. The GCCHSS is sponsored by The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati. This report completes the analysis of results from the 2010 GCCHSS.

Kentucky Health Issues Poll wraps up with regional results: Northern Kentucky adults less likely to be uninsured, more likely to report good health than Kentucky adults

April 30, 2012

The Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) has finalized analysis of the 2011 results with regional reports. According to KHIP, in general, responses from Northern Kentucky adults were comparable to the state as a whole. However, there were a few key differences in Northern Kentucky, as compared to the rest of the state. KHIP, conducted annually, identifies what residents think about various health issues that affect communities, the state and the nation. It is jointly funded by The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati and the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. Northern Kentucky results are from adults in the Northern Kentucky Area Development District.

Most Kentucky adults dispose of prescription drugs in unsafe ways

April 19, 2012

According to the Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP), more than 6 in 10 Kentucky adults (65 percent) dispose of prescriptions drugs by throwing them away or flushing them down the drainage system. “Kentuckians may not know that keeping unused prescription drugs in a medicine cabinet raises the risk of misuse and abuse of those drugs,” says Mary Francis, director of the Assistance for Substance Abuse Prevention (ASAP) Center. “In addition, many Kentuckians are not disposing of their drugs properly. This is a public safety and public health issue. Chemicals from wastewater find their way into the water supply, which can harm people and wildlife.” The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends the use of medicine take-back programs as the safest way to remove expired, unwanted or unused medicines from the home and to reduce the chance of accidental poisonings and overdoses.

Butler County adults eat more fast food, more likely to be diagnosed with severe allergies than Greater Cincinnati adults

April 3, 2012

The Greater Cincinnati Community Health Status Survey’s (GCCHSS) analysis of health data from an oversample of Butler County found that Butler County adults are more likely to eat fast food at least weekly. Just over two-thirds of Butler County adults (67 percent) reported that they eat fast food at least once a week, compared to 60 percent of all adults in Greater Cincinnati. The survey also found that about 1 in 4 Butler County adults (24 percent) have been told they had severe allergies, compared to about 1 in 6 Greater Cincinnati adults (16 percent). Butler County adults were also more likely to report that poor physical or mental health limited their daily activities. The GCCHSS is sponsored by The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati.

Health Status Survey: white Appalachians more likely have high blood pressure, cholesterol; more likely to be obese than white non-Appalachians

March 20, 2012

The Greater Cincinnati Community Health Status Survey’s (GCCHSS) analysis of health data from the white Appalachian population found that white Appalachian adults were more likely to report chronic cardiovascular conditions like high blood pressure and high cholesterol than white non-Appalachians, and were more likely to be obese. They were also less likely to meet recommendations for physical activity. They were similar to white non-Appalachians in reporting they went without a needed doctor’s care because the household needed the money to pay for food, clothing our housing. The percentages for both groups more than doubled between 2005 and 2010.

Almost half of Kentuckians report firearm around home; children are present in more than 4 in 10 homes that have firearms

March 13, 2012

According to the 2011 Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP), more than 4 in 10 Kentucky adults (45 percent) reported keeping firearms around their home, including in a garage, outdoor storage area or motor vehicle. This means that an estimated 750,000 Kentucky homes have firearms. More than 3 in 10 adults (35 percent) with firearms in or around their home keep their guns loaded. This means an estimated 250,000 Kentucky homes have loaded firearms. One-fifth of adults (20 percent) with firearms in or around their home keep their guns unlocked as well as loaded. This means an estimated 148,000 Kentucky homes have loaded and unlocked firearms. KHIP, conducted annually, identifies what residents think about various health issues that affect communities, the state and the nation. It is jointly funded by The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati and the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky.

1 in 3 Kentucky adults ages 18-64 are uninsured; fewer working-age adults are insured by employers

Jan 11, 2012

According to the 2011 Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP), about 1 in 3 Kentucky adults ages 18-64 are uninsured. More than half of low-income adults are uninsured, and younger adults under the age of 29 are more likely to be uninsured. Also, more working-age adults are uninsured or on public insurance, with fewer being insured by their employer. KHIP, conducted annually, identifies what residents think about various health issues that affect communities, the state and the nation. It is jointly funded by The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati and the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky.

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  • Results show shift in perception from substance abuse being seen as moral failure to a chronic illness.

    The Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found that 7 in 10 Kentucky adults believe that addiction is a disease (70%). Attitudes towards addiction as a disease were the same both among respondents who have a family member or friend who has experienced problems with substance abuse, and among those who did not indicate such firsthand experience with addiction.

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  • Kentucky adults continue to cite heroin use as causing problems for friends, family

    The most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) and Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP) has found that more than 2 in 10 Ohio adults (23%) report knowing someone who has trouble as a result of using heroin, while just under 2 in 10 Kentucky adults (16%) report knowing someone affected by heroin use.

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  • 8 in 10 Ohio adults say it’s easy to buy healthy foods in their neighborhood

    A majority of Ohio adults (81%) agree that it is easy to buy healthy foods in their neighborhood. However, responses vary by income. Nearly 9 in 10 Ohio adults in households earning more than 200% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines (87%) agree. That compares with fewer than 8 in 10 adults in households earning 200% FPG or less.

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  • Half of Ohio young adults have used an e-cigarette

    Nearly 3 in 10 Ohio adults (28 percent) reported having ever used an e-cigarette, according to the most recent Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP), sponsored by Interact for Health. This is higher than in 2016 (19 percent) and about the same as in 2015 (24 percent).

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  • Half of homes with children have guns

    The most recent Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP) found more than 4 in 10 (42%) of Ohio adults report keeping at least one firearm in or around their home. This number has increased from 2013, when 36% reported keeping a firearm.

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  • Number drops to slightly less than half in Northern Kentucky

    A majority (56%) of Kentucky adults say childhood obesity is a serious problem in the state, according to the most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll.

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  • Nearly all support having a nurse in each school building.

    The most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found that more than 8 in 10 Kentucky adults (84%) strongly or somewhat favor schools taking a more active role in helping families get health care services for children. Healthy students are able to achieve more academic success than those facing challenges to their health.

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  • More Kentucky adults have favorable opinion about ACA

    The most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found that more Kentucky adults have a favorable opinion of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (44%) than a negative opinion (33%). The percent of adults with a favorable opinion has been increasing since the poll first started tracking the ACA in 2010, when it became law. In 2010, 26% had a favorable opinion of the ACA.

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  • One in 4 Kentucky adults concerned about losing their health insurance.

    Rate of employer-sponsored health insurance declines; more Northern Kentucky adults lack insurance than in rest of state. The most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found one in four (24%) of insured Kentucky adults ages 18 to 64 are concerned about losing health coverage within the next year.

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  • Kentucky adults overwhelmingly favor tobacco-free schools.

    The most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found that nearly 9 in 10 adults (87%) favor schools adopting tobacco-free campus policies in their communities. Support for tobacco-free school policies has been consistently strong -- favored by 85% of Kentucky adults in 2015 and 84% in 2013.

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  • Most Kentucky adults favor raising minimum age to buy tobacco to 21.

    The most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found that nearly 6 in 10 Kentucky adults (58 percent) favor raising the minimum legal age to buy tobacco products from 18 to 21. This support has held steady since 2015, the first time KHIP asked this question. Interact for Health and the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky sponsored the poll.

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  • Nearly half of young adults in Kentucky have tried an e-cigarette

    The most recent Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found that nearly 3 in 10 Kentucky adults reported ever using e-cigarettes. The rate is higher than national statistics, where just over 2 in 10 adults reported ever using e-cigarettes. The highest reported use was among young adults in Kentucky, where nearly half said they had ever used an e-cigarette.

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  • Most Kentucky adults support a comprehensive statewide smoke-free law

    The 2017 Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP) found that 71 percent of Kentucky adults support a comprehensive statewide smoke-free law. This remains the highest level of support since the poll began tracking this topic.

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  • Half of Ohio adults say they favor needle exchange programs

    Half of Ohio adults (50 percent) said they favor and about 4 in 10 Ohio adults (42 percent) said they oppose needle exchange programs, according to the most recent Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP).

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  • 6 in 10 Ohio adults favor raising minimum age to buy tobacco to 21

    Six in 10 Ohio adults (58 percent) favor raising the minimum age to buy tobacco from 18 to 21 according to the 2017 Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP). This is an increase from 2016. A majority of Democrats (67 percent) and Republicans (60 percent) favored increasing the purchase age to 21. OHIP also asked if Ohio adults support a tax increase of 65 cents per pack of cigarettes; half of Ohio adults (53 percent) were in support.

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  • 2 in 10 allow smoking in homes.

    The 2017 Community Health Status Survey (CHSS), funded by Interact for Health, has found that 23 percent of adults in the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky area are current smokers. Although the rate has been steadily declining, our region is still higher than the nation, where 18 percent of adults were smokers in 2015.

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  • Greater Cincinnati Health Watch

    Greater Cincinnati Health Watch is a free biweekly e-mail newsletter published by Interact for Health. Each issue includes health news stories from Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, and the nation, with emphasis on topics related to Interact for Health's focus areas of substance use disorders, severe mental illness, school-aged children's healthcare, and community primary care.

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