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Most adults rate own homes, neighborhood housing well

Oct 31, 2017

DATA SUMMARYDATA TABLES

The home and community in which a person lives can affect all aspects of health. Houses in poor condition may increase the risk of injury or exposure to environmental hazards. The 2017 Community Health Status Survey (CHSS) asked adults in the region about the condition of neighborhood housing and their own home.

8 in 10 adults rate neighborhood housing well; varies by region

More than 8 in 10 adults in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky (83%) rated the condition of houses and apartments in their neighborhood as excellent, very good or good. This was the same as in 2013 (84%).

Responses varied geographically. Residents of Butler, Clinton and Warren counties in Ohio (91%) were most likely to rate neighborhood housing as excellent, very good or good. City of Cincinnati residents were least likely to rate neighborhood housing as excellent, very good or good (64%).

The percentage of adults who rated their neighborhood housing positively remained about the same between 2013 and 2017 in most areas. However, adults in rural Ohio counties1 were slightly more likely to rate neighborhood housing as excellent, very good or good in 2017 (83%) than in 2013 (78%). Also, residents of Boone, Campbell, Grant and Kenton counties in Kentucky were slightly less likely to rate neighborhood housing as excellent, very good or good in 2017 (80%) than in 2013 (86%).

9 in 10 adults rate their own home positively

Nine in 10 adults in the region rated the condition of their own house or apartment as excellent, very good or good. Responses varied by where adults live. About 9 in 10 adults in most areas rated their own home as excellent, very good or good. However, 8 in 10 adults in the City of Cincinnati rated their own home excellent, very good or good.

The percentage of adults who rated their own home positively remained about the same between 2013 and 2017 in most areas. However, adults in Boone, Campbell, Grant, and Kenton counties were less likely to rate their house or apartment as excellent, very good or good in 2017 (88%) than in 2013 (93%). Likewise, adults in rural Indiana counties2 were less likely to rate their home positively in 2017 (88%) than in 2013 (94%).

Adults with less income, African Americans less likely to rate homes positively

As income rises, the percentage of adults who rate their home positively rises, too. Among adults earning less than 100% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines (FPG),3 7 in 10 rated their own home as excellent, very good or good (70%). This is less than in 2013, when 8 in 10 rated their home well (80%).

Nine in 10 adults earning between 100% and 200% FPG rated their own home as excellent, very good or good (89%). Nearly all adults (96%) earning more than 200% FPG rated their own home as excellent, very good or good. These results were about the same as in 2013.

Home ratings also varied by race. Eight in 10 African American adults (80%) rated their own home as excellent, very good or good. This is less than the 9 in 10 White adults (91%) who rated their home this way. Home ownership may be a factor. Only 32% of African American households in our region are owned by the resident,4 compared with 72% of White households.5

Self-reported health and housing ratings

The presence of lead paint, poor ventilation, cold indoor conditions, poor air quality, lack of home safety devices and other hazards in homes in poor condition all can affect health.6

The 2017 CHSS found that adults in better health were more likely to rate the condition of their home positively. Fewer than 8 in 10 adults in fair or poor health7 rated the condition of their homes as excellent, very good or good (77%). This compared with nearly 9 in 10 adults in good health (88%) and nearly all adults in excellent or very good health (96%).


1 Adams, Brown, Clermont and Highland counties.

2 Dearborn, Franklin, Ohio, Ripley and Switzerland counties.

3 In 2015, 100% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines (FPG) was $24,250 for a family of four; 200% FPG was $48,500.

4 United States Census Bureau / American FactFinder. “B25003B: Occupied housing units with a householder who is black or African American alone.” 2011-2015 American Community Survey. U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey Office, 2015. Retrieved from www.factfinder.census.gov.

5 United States Census Bureau / American FactFinder. “B25003A: Occupied housing units with a householder who is White alone.” 2011-2015 American Community Survey. U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey Office, 2015. Retrieved from www.factfinder.census.gov.

6 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (2011). Exploring the social determinants of health: Housing and health. New Jersey: Author. Retrieved from http://www.rwjf.org/content/dam/farm/reports/issue_briefs/2011/rwjf70451.

7 CHSS asked ”In general, would you say your health is excellent, very good, good, fair or poor?”

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